In the past few weeks, the wave of poetry had hit the school hard, as we saw brilliant submissions of works of literature that were comparable to the likes of Lang Leav and Shakespeare! Hidden within the school’s population, here are some incredible poems from budding poets that will definitely keep you reading on and yearning for more!

To begin, David Aw from Year 1, a seasoned Casanova, will melt your heart with his romantic poem, which has some Tort Law weaved in. Sometimes, you do just negligently fall in love, don’t you?

 —

Loving you is more than a matter of

proximity

a thing of real substance;

close ties and

affection

My reliance on you is a surrender to your

professional expertise

(at shattering my soul)

But there has never been any voluntary

assumption of responsibility

on your part

for my

heart

Which is why as a matter of policy

(private)

I must find no duty of care

And the only thing I would hold against

you

is myself

Which is why my liability to you is just

like your affection for me:

indeterminate at best.

  —

I am sure girls out there are absolutely swooning now. For any guys who think they’re in need of some poetry (or love-life) tips from David, you may approach this writer for his contact details.

Moving on, Jerrold Soh from Year 2 will bring you back to your JC’s English Literature days as he brings you a Shakespearean-style play flourished with elements of Property Law. Who said lawyers don’t have good pick-up lines?

 —

Fifty Shades of Gray (and Gray)

Act V Scene III

  

Enter Lord and Servant

Lord

Would that thou were there!

Servant

Pray tell, milord, I know not where.

Lord

Last night upon the moonlight, starry

I stumbled on a night-house, rosy

Having had six full shots of whisky

Electric tension filled the air.

When suddenly I spied a lady

At once I knew I was to marry

For all I knew she was a fairy

Dispatched to carry all my heirs.

For fifteen minutes I did tarry

Before I made my pilgrim’s journey

But having had six more shots of brandy

I remember now not my lady fair.

Servant

Milord, forgive me for so asking

But did you at once set to lodging

Your interests with a caveat pare?

Lord

Nay, my servant, for in that state

I feared that I would alienate

Her heart into many an undivided share.

Fret not, for with torrential love,

My interests I can only prove.

I shall look upon as done

That and those whom ought to be done.

Before one claims an equity

I shall have her at the Registry.

Servant

Milord! Suppress thy possessive urge.

Pray, first perform a title search.

Lord

I shall have none of that –

Quick! It is her!

[Exit Servant]

Milady! Pray grant me a freehold

In thy fair and fine estate.

Or let me have a mortgage

With a right to redeem your heart.

Bid thy give me a tenancy

To exclusively possess thy fate.

Else instead grant me probate

For I shall perish intestate.

Lady

More wistful words were never heard

In a fool’s futile soiree.

Last night thou wert not much more

Than bare licensee.

I’ve locked my heart and kept the key

You never owned a fee.

Twas but consent that turned trespass

Into one night – fun and fast.

Lord

Milady is sharp in tongue and wit

To evict me from thy heart.

I shall have to file a writ

To reclaim my rightful part.

Dispense us with formality

A lease in equity’s fine.

Or must I resort to register

My indefeasible right?

Lady

Thy lease is short of seven years

Don’t bother with the act.

I barely even noticed.

Can you prove it in fact?

Not even thy resulting trust

Could convey thy weak advance.

Exclusive occupation for a day

Does not create a lease.

Labels thy blindly chose to say

Are far from conclusive.

Pray heed these words of severance.

Bid thou be on thy way.

If thou must – call it a fling.

But know we were never

Restrictively covenanting.

Lord

Doth not what I remember.

For my skillful searching hands

Did concern and touch thy lands…

Wait, where art thou going?

[Exeunt]

 —

*With inspiration from Law Jia Hao

How’s that for a play! Having read 2 incredible works that propelled you into your realms of imagination, it is this writer’s reluctance to have to bring you back to reality. Here is a final submission from Felicia Chew, a Year 3 student, who succinctly summarized the vicissitudes of law school in her poem:

  —

“Stepping into law school with aspiration,

Thinking my CAP 5 is within realisation,

After one week no more inspiration,

After your first LAWR assignment, exasperation,

Before your every exam, desperation.

A story of my life in summarization.”

 —

That’s essentially law school in 6 lines, isn’t it? Poetry is the best way to express one’s thoughts and feeling. It has no boundaries, no limitations, no restrictions and definitely no frustration (if you get this writer’s futile attempt at making a contract reference). So what are you waiting for? Pick up a pen and start creating your own masterpieces now!

Editor’s note: If you feel particular interested to see some of the works of our own beloved Prof’s, check out LSRIC’s Valentine’s Day Special from 2 years back, featuring some pretty amazing (and funny) poems by our Profs!

Love x Words

Article by: Suah Boon Chong (Year 1)